Category: Collectible Coins

Early American currency went through several stages of development in colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. Because few coins were minted in the thirteen colonies that became the United States in 1776, foreign coins like the Spanish dollar were widely circulated. Colonial governments sometimes issued paper money to facilitate economic activities. The British Parliament passed Currency Acts in 1751, 1764, and 1773 that regulated colonial paper money. During the American Revolution, the colonies became independent states; freed from British monetary regulations, they issued paper money to pay for military expenses. The Continental Congress also issued paper money during the Revolution, known as Continental currency, to fund the war effort. Both state and Continental currency depreciated rapidly, becoming practically worthless by the end of the war. This depreciation was caused by the government having to over-print in order to meet the demands of war. There were three general types of money in the colonies of British America: specie (coins), paper money and commodity money.[1] Commodity money was used when cash (coins and paper money) was scarce. Commodities such as tobacco, beaver skins, and wampum served as money at various times and places.[2] Cash in the colonies was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence.[2] The value varied from colony to colony; a Massachusetts pound, for example, was not equivalent to a Pennsylvania pound. All colonial pounds were of less value than the British pound sterling.[2] The coins in circulation in the colonies were most often of Spanish and Portuguese origin.[2] The prevalence of the Spanish dollar in the colonies led to the money of the United States being denominated in dollars rather than pounds.[2] One by one, colonies began to issue their own paper money to serve as a convenient medium of exchange. In 1690, the Province of Massachusetts Bay created "the first authorized paper money issued by any government in the Western World."[3] This paper money was issued to pay for a military expedition during King William's War. Other colonies followed the example of Massachusetts Bay by issuing their own paper currency in subsequent military conflicts.[3] The paper bills issued by the colonies were known as "bills of credit." Bills of credit were usually fiat money: they could not be exchanged for a fixed amount of gold or silver coins upon demand.[2][4] Bills of credit were usually issued by colonial governments to pay debts. The governments would then retire the currency by accepting the bills for payment of taxes. When colonial governments issued too many bills of credit or failed to tax them out of circulation, inflation resulted. This happened especially in New England and the southern colonies, which, unlike the Middle Colonies, were frequently at war.[4] Pennsylvania, however, was responsible in not issuing too much currency and it remains a prime example in history as a successful government-managed monetary system. Pennsylvania's paper currency, secured by land, was said to have generally maintained its value against gold from 1723 until the Revolution broke out in 1775. This depreciation of colonial currency was harmful to creditors in Great Britain when colonists paid their debts with money that had lost value. The British Parliament passed several Currency Acts to regulate the paper money issued by the colonies. The Currency Act of 1751 restricted the emission of paper money in New England. It allowed the existing bills to be used as legal tender for public debts (i.e. paying taxes), but disallowed their use for private debts (e.g. for paying merchants).[5] In 1776, British (Scot) economist Adam Smith criticized colonial bills of credit in his most famous work, The Wealth of Nations. Another Currency Act, in 1764, extended the restrictions to the colonies south of New England. Unlike the earlier act, this act did not prohibit the colonies in question from issuing paper money but it forbade them to designate their currency as legal tender for public or private debts. That prohibition created tension between the colonies and the mother country and has sometimes been seen as a contributing factor in the coming of the American Revolution. After much lobbying, Parliament amended the act in 1773, permitting the colonies to issue paper currency as legal tender for public debts.[6] Shortly thereafter, some colonies once again began issuing paper money. When the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, all of the rebel colonies, soon to be independent states, issued paper money to pay for military expenses. Thirteen colony set of United States Colonial currency[edit] The Thirteen Colony set of colonial currency below is from the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution. Examples were selected based on the notability of the signers, followed by issue date and condition. The initial selection criteria for notability was drawn from a list[7] of currency signers who were also known to have signed the United States Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, the United States Constitution, or attended the Stamp Act Congress

Collecting Colonial Currency

Early American Colonial Currency Early American currency went through several stages of development in colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. Because few coins were minted in the thirteen colonies that became the United States in 1776, foreign coins like the Spanish dollar were widely circulated. Colonial governments sometimes issued paper money to facilitate […]

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Peace Silver Dollar Super Nice Collector Coin for your Set or Collection

The Peace dollar is a United States dollar coin minted from 1921 to 1928, and again in 1934 and 1935. Designed by Anthony de Francisci, the coin was the result of a competition to find designs emblematic of peace. Its obverse represents the head and neck of the Goddess of Liberty in profile, and the […]

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Retirement – You need a Gold IRA because they combine the time-tested security of a physical asset….

Gold American Eagle The Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985 was signed by President Ronald Reagan and production of American Eagle gold coins started in 1986 allowing the United States to compete with other gold coins such as the Canadian Maple Leaf and the South African Krugerrand. The Act requires that all coins be produced […]

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Littleton Coin LCA1 Lincoln Cent Album 1909-1958- Case of 12

Littleton Coin LCA1 Lincoln Cent Album 1909-1958- Case of 12 Organize and display your collection with Littleton’s custom 1909-1958 Lincoln Cent Album- Labeled spaces for all regular issues from the P D and S Mints including the 1909 VDB and 1909-S VDB- Handsome deep green album with gold-embossed lettering- Sturdy 3-ring binder construction- Clear protective […]

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Deals & Special Prices on Beautiful Peace Dollars

The Morgan dollar was a United States dollar coin minted from 1878 to 1904, and then again in 1921. It was the first standard silver dollar minted since production of the previous design, the Seated Liberty dollar, ceased due to the passage of the Coinage Act of 1873, which also ended the free coining of […]

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Shop Silver MS65 Mint Morgan Dollars

The Sheldon Coin Grading Scale is a 70-point coin grading scale used in the numismatic assessment of a Morgan Dollar. A Mint State MS65 Morgan Dollar shows an attractive high quality of luster and strike for the date and originating mint. A few, small, scattered, contact marks, or two larger marks may be present, and […]

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Great Special Savings and Deals On American Eagle Silver Coin 1 oz 999 Fine Silver $1 Brilliant Uncirculated US Mint

  Great Special Savings and Deals On American Eagle Silver Coin 1 oz 999 Fine Silver $1 Brilliant Uncirculated US Mint 1.) 2015 American Silver Eagle BU U.S. Mint $1 2.) 2015 American Eagle Silver Coin 1 oz 999 Fine Silver $1 Brilliant Uncirculated US      Mint 3.) 2015 American Eagle Silver 5 Coins […]

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